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Trusted Computing (TC)

Status: Archived

Archived funding opportunity

This document has been archived.

Important information for proposers

All proposals must be submitted in accordance with the requirements specified in this funding opportunity and in the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) that is in effect for the relevant due date to which the proposal is being submitted. It is the responsibility of the proposer to ensure that the proposal meets these requirements. Submitting a proposal prior to a specified deadline does not negate this requirement.

Synopsis

This program seeks to establish a sound scientific foundation and technological basis for managing privacy and security in a world linked through computing and communication technology. This research is necessary to build the secure and reliable systems required for a highly interconnected, information technology enabled society. The program supports innovative research in all aspects of secure, reliable information systems, including methods for assessing the trustworthiness of systems. Some specific areas in which research is needed include:

  • Component technologies: specification, design, development, test, verification methods to provide quantifiable assurance that specified properties are met. Ideally, such technologies should be flexible, so that they can be applied in accordance with the degree of trustworthiness required and the resources available. Methods are needed to identify particular components that provide a good basis on which to construct trustworthy systems.
  • Composition methods: Assembling components into subsystems and systems with known and quantifiable trustworthiness. Identifying and minimizing the security assumptions made in a given security design. Exploiting the existence of large numbers of untrustworthy computing platforms effectively to create secure or trustworthy multiparty computations.
  • Methods for maintaining trustworthiness as systems adapt and evolve.
  • Methods for improving human understanding of critical system behavior and control.
  • Methods for assessing tradeoffs in trustworthy system design, for example between security and performance.
  • Techniques for modeling, analyzing, and predicting trust properties of systems and components.

Program contacts

Awards made through this program

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